Netflix’s Fyre Documentary Has Delusion, Ego and Fraud on a Grand Scale

As I watched Netflix’s new documentary, Fyre, I couldn’t stop putting my hands over my eyes. For anyone that’s ever run an event and felt it going a little off the rails, Fyre will be anxiety-inducing. However, watching a complete disaster of this nature unfold is also hilarious and highly entertaining.

The documentary is a behind the scenes look at the infamous unravelling of the Fyre music festival that was created by Billy McFarland and rapper Ja Rule. The event was promoted as a luxury festival on a private island in the Bahamas. Millennials who paid outrageous sums of money for tickets were expecting bikini-clad supermodels, an A-List lineup and rockstar amenities. When they arrived the reality was very different.

Look, although it was very sad that many people got financially burnt, my heart really doesn’t bleed for those who willingly forked out up to $250,000 for tickets based on the promos they saw. Comedian, Ron Funches, nailed it when he said: “If you had thousands of dollars to go on a trip to see Blink 182, that’s on you… that is Darwinism at its finest.”

Watch the trailer.

Read a Fyre review.

Watch Fyre on Netflix.

Samin Nosrat’s SALT FAT ACID HEAT Cooking Documentary on Netflix is Pure Joy

Salt Fat Acid Heat is a captivating four-part series on Netflix and is based on Samin Nosrat’s best-selling book of the same name.

Samin believes that if you can master these four elements, you can master the kitchen. In this new series, she travels to home kitchens of Italy, the southern islands of Japan, the heat of the Yucatán and back to Berkeley’s Chez Panisse – where she started her culinary career – to demystify and explore the central principles of what makes food delicious and how each of us can easily incorporate those elements into every dish.

If your heart is still racing from the tension of Bodyguard and you’re after something more uplifting to remind you of the good things the world has to offer, let Salt Fat Acid Heat soothe you. It’s pure joy, beautifully shot (reminiscent of the excellent Chef’s Table), with the only downside being you’ll want to leave your life and start a new one like hers.

Watch the trailer.

Watch Salt Fat Acid Heat on Netflix.

Wild Wild Country – A Wild Documentary on Netflix

Wild Wild Country is a six-part documentary on Netflix about the controversial Indian guru, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh (Osho), and the community, Rajneeshpuram, he set up in Antelope, Oregon, in the early 1980s.

Well, he didn’t set it up. He didn’t do much in the early days except make an entrance at important moments in a Rolls-Royce, wearing lots of bling, and reaping all the glory. Sometimes he would dance. Mainly with the women. Ma Anand Sheela, Osho’s right-hand lady, was responsible for all the important bits. She was the brains behind most of it and is the real star of the show.

I don’t want to reveal too much about what goes on except to say that as a result of the locals resenting the commune/city, it all goes downhill very quickly, in a spectacular way. And it’s a thrill to watch.

Don’t read the reviews (they are good) because if you’re like me and knew little about this story, you will be gobsmacked and thoroughly entertained with the twists and turns it takes.

Watch the trailer.

Watch Wild Wild Country on Netflix.

Tickled – A Bizarre and Intriguing Documentary

Tickled is a documentary that explores the world of ‘competitive endurance tickling’, starting out as a light-hearted and entertaining human interest story that gets pretty dark, pretty quickly. If you’re indecisive or arguing with someone about what to watch one evening, give this a go as will provide you with part comedy, part thriller, part investigative journalism. For a good overview that doesn’t give too much away, check out this review. Watch the trailer. It’s available on iTunes.

Weiner – Political and Entertaining Documentary

A documentary following Anthony Weiner and the sexting scandals he’s now infamous for that subsequently collapsed his personal and political worlds, starting from his time in Congress through to his campaign for Mayor of New York City.

I was captivated by this film for many reasons:

(1) How anyone would want to have a documentary crew follow them around given the circumstances (he confesses later in the film that his intention was for some version of the truth to be told)

(2) His stunning and impeccably dressed wife, Huma Abedin (Hillary Clinton’s right hand lady), and the way she dealt with his indiscretions

(3) His relentless drive and energy that kept him on the campaign trail despite the full on drama that was happening in every part of his life

(4) His name and wondering whether this would ever have become such a huge story and source of entertainment had he been fortunate enough to have a different surname (probably not).

It’s cringeworthy but highly entertaining.

View the trailer or watch it on iTunes.

Stingray Sisters Documentary

This deeply moving three-part documentary is a must watch.

Stingray Sisters opens a window into the lives of the Eather sisters as they struggle to protect their home (Maningrida, a remote town in Northern Territory’s Arnhem Land) from oil and gas exploration and navigate their way between two very different cultural worlds.

I have so much to say about this beautifully crafted and visually stunning film and my words will not do it justice.

View the trailer.

Learn more about the sisters’ story and watch the series here.

Tig Documentary on Netflix

notaro-2
Image from soundfestival.com

The personal biography of Tig Notaro, a stand-up comedian who was diagnosed with cancer and announced it at a gig in 2012 which became legendary. The documentary follows her search for humour amid this and other devastating news. I’ve since heard some of her work on This American Life. Loved her, loved the film. It’s a Netflix Original. View trailer.

 

Racing Extinction Documentary

I have not been moved to tears like this by a documentary since Blackfish. Racing Extinction follows undercover activists attempting to save us from man made extinction. The message gets across dramatically and creatively.

View trailer.

Find out about the documentary and where to watch it here.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: